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20130423
20130423
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. bush's nominees and two of president obama's nominees. so i ask consent to put in the record this summary of president obama's nominations, along with an article from "the washington post" that points out that president obama's nominees have been confirmed more rapidly than those of the last three presidents in his first term. i ask consent to put that in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. alexander: thank you, mr. president. now, to be more specific about the -- about these matters, let's take circuit court judicial confirmations in president obama's first term. according to our research, the average time for president obama's nominees was 240 days. that's faster than president george w. bush, 277 days from nomination to confirmation. so circuit court judicial confirmations, which are usually the subject of great interest around here, president obama treated better than president george w. bush. slightly better. first-term district court nominees -- the obama average time, 221 days, is slower than george w. bush, 156 days from nomination to considerati
't happen in the bush administration, didn't happen in the obama administration, so that was never -- that's just not -- it's irrelevant at this point. now the case is under way. the fact that he was well enough to be arraigned on the complaint means now that the government will move to present this case in the grand jury, probably within a month there will be an indictment, and then the case will move to a federal district court. at that point, i expect things will slow down quite a bit. i would be surprised, given the magnitude and complexity of this case, that there could be a trial inside of a year, but at least now the process is under way. >> juliette, from a law enforcement standpoint, do you think it was the right decision to try him in civilian court? >> absolutely. like what jeff said, there is just really no debate about this. it's more of a political debate. for one, the law doesn't even cover him because he's a u.s. citizen. but from a law enforcement national security perspective, what better way to minimize the impact of terrorists than to treat them like criminals. that's w
that this administration did early on, and the obama administrations continued a lot of the national security policies in the bush administration, to be clear. but they did establish this high value interrogation target group where we've got high value interrogation subjects, and they have a team that they keep very secret and under wraps that they sort of fly in to do, conduct the most important interrogations. and we have been told that they will be leading the interrogation of the boston suspect. how will that team approach interrogating this young man? >> i think they will do it like any fbi agent or any law enforcement individual will do it. these individuals are trained to collect intelligence from detainees. but also on the same time now we have a suspect who already was read his miranda rights. he already have a lawyer present. and i don't think that should affect any trained interrogator, any trained interviewer in doing their job. we have been doing this for many, many years. we did it against terrorist suspects, organized crimes, people who are charged with treason, spies, and it always wor
than it is today. bush won the war by courageous decision about the surge. i would argue that president obama is sqaunledering the peace by failing get status of forces where he president obama, said was important for stablizing iraq an maintaining friendship with it for decades to come. president bush is content with the judgement of history. people are being able to look back and say, increasingly the things he did were right. we understand better why he did them and he is content with that. martha: that will be interesting to see the library opening and sort of go back to some of those words and revisit that history as i know we're going to do on thursday. but you know, one of the constituencies that helped propel president bush into office was the hispanic vote. he had one of the strongest showings of that part of the voting population of recent presidents. that has changed in many ways for republicans and there's a story this morning in "politico" says if this immigration reform bill passes that that future is even more bleak in places lake nevada and colorado and ohio. think those
: that tells us all lot about what the aclu tells us about the various methods by the bush administration and the obama administration. drone are among the tools. if this is another method of fighting terrorism -- guest: you can look at our website. there is a great deal of work in this area. somese of force in circumstances may be permitted when there is a threat. permissible. when those boundaries are expanded, it would be unlawful. we think the government has done the right thing. has, the federal government done the exact right thing by crimeng this as a federal that has to be investigated. . want to hone in on this the military is somehow better than our intelligence professionals and other agencies. i think it does them a great disservice to imply that. havenforcement, the fbi their role in other areas. was a to confuse the two terrible mistake under the bush administration. obamaa good thing the administration is not making that mistake now. with the aclu.si thank you so much. clifford may, president of the foundation for defense of democracies. column.s a weekly thank you to you a
seen throughout much of the obama administration. this is much more of a doctrine of keeping people in individual cells similar to what went on during the bush years. >> suarez: carol rosenberg of the miami herald, thanks for joining us. >> thank you, ray. >> brown: online later tonight, you can see additional excerpts from ray's interview with carol rosenberg, including more on those 86 detainees, cleared for release, who remain at guantanamo. >> ifill: now, economics correspondent paul solman reports on late-blooming self-starters. it's the latest chapter in his look at older workers in the american economy and all part of his on-going reporting "making sense of financial news." >> look at this nice, tight stomach with the abs which you could grate cheese on. >> reporter: at 55, judi henderson-townsend is working with a much younger crowd. >> it's like living in the land of dorian gray here. nobody ever ages. >> reporter: after a career spent working with stiffs in the corporate world, says townsend, she started mannequin madness. >> i sell mannequins, i rent mannequins, i repair
. let him respond, please. >> i did. i sided with barack obama. sidedd with john kerry, i with barney frank to enis that your our entire country did not collapse. the bush administration turned a blind eye that a casino was set up in wall street. i did not support any of the bush administration financial regulations policies. but when the threat was the system was going to collapse and hurt every family in america, i did that to protect our financial system from collapsing and you did not. in addition, on telecommunication it was my egislation that broke down the telecom monopoly that led to a broadband revolution that created many millions of jobs in the united states of america. i'm very proud of that. my name is on the legislation and i'm proud that my name is on much of that legislation. it was my job to go to washington -- >> that's my point. that's my point. you said we were going to talk a this, you're proud of that and that is the problem. we have one cable company mcast that runs from here to washington, d.c. there is no companies. verizon has the whole market. open up your c
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)